New Lacrosse Recruiting Rules

In case you haven't heard, the NCAA just passed a proposal that would eliminate recruiting in high school lacrosse until September 1 of a student's junior year. The proposal hasn't been officially adopted yet, but most people say it will pass.

Yes, feel free to take a long, drawn-out, sigh of relief.  You deserve it!

For those who don't appreciate this development, here's what's been going on: 

Top college lacrosse programs have increasingly been making verbal "offers" to kids while they are still in 8th grade. I won't get into how messy this has made the recruiting process for all involved. I'm sure you can imagine the pressure, anxiety, and craziness that this has wrought for coaches, parents, and students. 

Assuming the proposal passes, here's how things will likely change:

College Coaches
This is a big bonus for them. They didn't like this process either. They didn't enjoy having to keep track of middle school prospects. It was like a lottery, where coaches had to...

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10th-grade lacrosse player commits to Harvard

Can a sophomore commit to the Ivy League?

Good question. This blog sets out to answer a handful of questions regarding Ivy League recruiting, early commits, Academic Index, Athletic Boosters, etc.

[In this account, "Harvard" is used only to help illustrate the process]

While this example is specific to Ivy League men's lacrosse, I hope it raises some relevant issues for your son/daughter if they aspire to play a sport in college.

How can a 10th-grader "commit" to an Ivy League School when they haven't even taken the SAT or ACT yet?

For select sports (e.g. men's lacrosse), the recruiting process starts early (8th/9th grade) and players travel far and wide during the summers to gain exposure to top programs.

By early sophomore year, the highest profile lacrosse players often verbally commit to a school (more on why they might do this later). Coaches asleep at the switch risk missing out on the hottest prospects.

This so-called "commitment" is non-binding, not in writing, and...

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